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The Norton Presents Andy Warhol’s First Superstar, “Baby” Jane Holze

Feb 2, 2014 - Mar 25, 2014

The Norton Museum of Art, in collaboration with The Andy Warhol Museum, is presenting the first exhibition to focus on the relationship between artist Andy Warhol and his muse Jane Holzer – popularly known as “Baby Jane.” To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar, will be on view Feb. 2 - May 25, 2014 and explores the Holzer’s rise as well as Warhol’s art, emphasizing the period of 1962-1965.  The exhibition will include films featuring Holzer, paintings, sculpture, and prints, as well as rarely seen material from Warhol’s own “Time Capsules.”  A Warhol and Film panel discussion is set for 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 2, featuring Holzer and prominent curators familiar with Warhol’s films.

“As Andy Warhol’s first and most glamorous superstar, as well as a lifelong intimate, Jane Holzer offers singular insight into understanding  Warhol as a prescient artist, media star, and focus of the 1960s cult of personality,” said Cheryl Brutvan, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Curator of Contemporary Art at the Norton. “The Norton is delighted to celebrate Jane Holzer who is a Palm Beach native and continues to have close associations with the community.”

The exhibition examines the rise of “Baby Jane,” a nickname given to Holzer by a Women’s Wear Daily columnist in 1962. Through fashions Holzer wore during the height of her modeling career for Vogue (among other publications), fashion layouts, and photographs of Holzer, her  early, independent identity and associations with the fashion world will be explored. The frenzied attention paid to Holzer prompted author Tom Wolfe to profile her in his 1964 essay, “The Girl of the Year.”

Holzer’s entry into Warhol’s circle and her role as a member and muse who contributed to the early years of his New York studio, The Factory, is seen through Warhol’s art and, especially his films which were of primary concern to him at the time.  Warhol created many of his iconic works, including the various series of paintings titled, Flowers, Jackie, and Death and Disasters during Holzer’s association with the studio from approximately 1962-1965.He also produced many films during this time with Holzer’s participation, including Kiss (1963-1964), Soap Opera (1964), Batman and Dracula (1964), and eight Screen Tests (1964-1966), among others.

“Holzer provides a significant counterpoint to many of the other visitors to Warhol’s studio,” Brutvan said. “She entered The Factory as an established, successful model. Warhol benefitted from her ‘it’ girl status and social connections. Holzer, in turn, benefitted from Warhol’s filmmaking, which fulfilled her early ambition to be in movies.”

“Andy Warhol and Baby Jane Holzer hold a special place in American pop culture,” said Norton Museum Executive Director Hope Alswang. “He was the epitome of the avant-garde and she was the epitome of style. The Norton is honored that Jane entrusted the Museum to draw back the curtain on this very public, yet intimate friendship to better understand this rich period in Warhol’s life and in American art.”

With updated technology by The Andy Warhol Museum, visitors will have the opportunity to create their own “Screen Test” while experiencing one of the challenges Warhol’s stars faced – sit for three minutes without blinking. Each visitor’s screen test will be posted on a custom web page where it can be shared with various social media outlets.  

Exhibition-related programs include:

  • Warhol and Filmpanel discussion at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014:The panel features distinguished museum curators familiar with Warhol’s contributions to film, including Stuart Comer, Chief Curator of the Department of Media and Performance Art at The Museum of Modern Art; Claire K. Henry, Senior Curatorial Assistant, The Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney Museum of American Art; and Geralyn Huxley, Curator of Film and Video at The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.  Jane Holzer is the panel’s special guest. The program is free with Museum admission.
  • Art 101 mini-course, Warhol’s ‘60s:This three-part course looks at the heyday of Warhol’s Factory, and other contemporary approaches to art that continue to resonate today; gallery discussions and power-point presentations led by Museum staff, 1 to 3 p.m. on three consecutive Wednesdays: Feb. 26, March 5, and March 12. Registration is $75 for members and $100 for non-members. Call (561) 832-5196, x 1113.
  • To Jane, Love AndyCurator’s Conversation at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014: Organizing curator for the exhibition, Cheryl Brutvan, leads a discussion of the exhibition during Art After Dark.
  • Cinema of the ‘60s series, beginning 6:30 p.m. March 20, 2014: Film scholar, author, and former Palm Beach Post Books Editor Scott Eyman screens cutting-edge films by some of the most daring filmmakers working in New York during the 1960s. Each screening will be followed by a discussion. The series opens during Art After Dark with D.A. Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back, a documentary about Bob Dylan’s 1965 UK concert tour, and closes on April 17 with films by Warhol. This program is made possible in part through the generosity of the Gayle and Paul Gross Education Endowment Fund.

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